Quick Answer: Why did China build dams along the Mekong River?

Why is the Mekong River important to China?

The Mekong River provides water, energy and food to six countries in South-East Asia. … China has built 11 of the world’s largest dams on its portion of the river, with plans to construct several more. Those dams store more than 47 billion cubic metres of water and can generate more than 21,000 megawatts of electricity.

What is the reason of Mekong dam’s building?

Commercial operation of the dam started in October 2019. The main purpose of the dam is to produce hydroelectric power, 95% of which is to be purchased by the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT). The project is surrounded in controversy due to complaints from downstream riparians and environmentalists.

What is China doing to damage the Mekong River?

China’s Dam-Building Is Harming the Mekong River

The water flow of the Mekong has hit record lows, caused by a reduction in rainfall and upstream hydropower dams, according to a report. The Mekong River at Sangkhom district in the northeastern Thai province of Nong Khai, with Laos seen on the right bank.

Which city is associated with the river Mekong?

Phnom-Penh cities is associated with the river Mekong. The river flows through Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam before draining into the South China Sea south of Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon).

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What is the primary benefit of building hydroelectric dams on the Mekong River?

According to the MRC Council Study on the Sustainable Management and Development of the Mekong River Basin including Impacts of Mainstream Hydropower Projects, the LMB could see economic gains from full hydropower development of more than $160 billion by 2040. Development of hydropower brings synergies with other water …

What are the negatives of the Mekong River dams?

Hydropower dams have had a dramatic effect on the Mekong river over the last two decades, resulting in unseasonable flooding and droughts, low water levels in the dry season, and drops in the amounts of sediment carried by the river, with drastic consequences for biodiversity and fisheries.