What did a tunnel rat do in Vietnam?

What was it like being a tunnel rat?

They had to be small and thin, volunteers, and highly skilled at hand-to-hand combat. The job was to kill, capture or entomb Viet Cong with explosives. The favored weapon was a small-caliber revolver. … ”There never were more than 100 Tunnel Rats, and most were killed in the tunnels.

What were the odds of surviving Vietnam?

85% of Vietnam Veterans made successful transitions to civilian life. 97% of Vietnam Veterans were honorably discharged. 91% of Vietnam Veterans say they are glad they served. 74% say they would serve again, even knowing the outcome.

How many enemy died in Vietnam?

Total number of deaths

Low estimate of deaths High estimate of deaths
North Vietnam/Viet Cong military and civilian war dead 533,000 1,489,000
South Vietnam/U.S./South Korea war military and civilian war dead 429,000 1,119,000
Democide by North Vietnam/Viet Cong 131,000 302,000
Democide by South Vietnam 57,000 284,000

What percentage of tunnel rats died?

A tunnel rat checks out a possible ventilation shaft. Marrett reportedly spent weeks in the bush locating and disarming mines, “During that period 36 of us were killed and around 200 were wounded, giving us a casualty rate of 33 percent, high even by Vietnam War standards.

Did they use trenches in Vietnam War?

The Cu Chi (pronounced Ku Chi) tunnels are an extensive 250-mile (around 400km) network of underground trenches dug manually by the Vietnamese people and Viet Cong guerillas to protect themselves from the merciless bombing unleashed by American forces who fought a war in Vietnam in 1964-73.

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How did Vietnam tunnels not collapse?

The soil lining of the tunnel and steps which led up from the tunnels to the entrance were so resilient it was hard for the enemy to destroy the tunnels. This tunnel entrance was preserved as part of the Vietnam War memorial park.

How deep did Vietnam tunnels go?

There were a variety of tunnel types: squad-size tunnels generally were less than 6-feet deep and 100-feet long; company-size tunnels were wider but not extensively compartmented; and battalion-size tunnels could burrow 50 feet underground and sometimes contain up to four different levels.